stop making excuses tiles

Stop making excuses and make today your day 1

When you make the decision that today is going to be the day, what goes through your mind? Are you scared, excited, worried, confused? The answer is probably very simply – YES! Yes, you feel scared; Yes, you are excited; Yes, you are worried; and Yes, you are confused. And that is normal. Making the decision to stop using and to get the help you need to get sober is a huge, lifelong commitment; to say you didn’t have all of the feelings would be a little untrue. Actually, having these feelings can help you, as they show just how much you really want to be on this journey, and know how important it actually is.

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older man sitting alone bored

Stop using out of boredom

Making the decision to quit drinking is never easy. Once you do make the choice and are working hard to not only protect, but progress your sobriety, it is important to acknowledge that there are triggers that will pop up that will make you perhaps question or even reconsider your choice to be sober. Daily stresses can make sobriety difficult; however, another trigger that is very commonly one of the most difficult to control is boredom.

Here are five great and helpful ways control your urges when boredom strikes:

  1. Keep your days scheduled and structured

    Scheduling your time to ensure you have little to no down-time, especially in the early days of your recovery can help eliminate boredom. It is very likely that prior to choosing this new path of sobriety, having a drink or many drinks was a common occurrence.

  2. Don’t allow any alcohol into your home

    It is your choice to stop allowing any type of alcohol or substance into your house once you are in recovery. By making this choice it makes it that much harder to pick up a drink or resort to old behaviours when there is nothing else to do.

  3. Take up a new hobby

    Instead of sitting around doing nothing with all of the free time you now have now that you are not drinking your days away,  take up a new hobby to fill the void. Some great new hobbies to try include: painting, journalling,  learning a new language or how to play an instrument, hiking, gardening, working out, running or yoga. Your options are limitless when it comes to picking a new hobby, the most important part is that you enjoy it.

  4. Focus on self-care

    Self-care is very important for everyone, not only just those that are in recovery. By taking the necessary time to focus on your mental health, you will not only have a better understanding of who you are, but maybe even the reasons you chose to drink in the first place. Once you understand yourself, it is much easier to make conscious decisions to change your behaviours.

  5. Maintain connection with your support group

    Having someone to reach out to at any time of day is very important during recovery. Addiction triggers can pop up when you least expect it. Knowing you can connect with someone who not only understands your journey, but can also support you

Making the decision to get sober is a very big decision. It is important to understand the triggers that may arise during your recovery and be prepared as possible to handle them. If you are struggling with addiction and are looking for support to get sober, contact The Farm Rehab today. Our in-patient treatment programs offer individualized plans to help you understand your addiction and the best way to take back control over your life.

addiction craving

Managing your addiction cravings

Unsolicited and unexpected cravings are par for the course when you are struggling with addiction. Much like craving a sugary treat when dieting, restricting yourself from something you would normally have will almost always result in cravings. It is, however, how you manage them, that will make all the difference. To assist you on difficult days, we have compiled some of our most tried and true ways to manage your addiction cravings.

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woman asking for help with addiction

How to ask for help to get sober

One of the most difficult things for someone to do that is struggling with addiction is to ask for help to get sober. Understanding and accepting you are struggling with addiction is never easy, so much so it is also the reason that so many continue using.  However, if you are at the point where you know you need the help, there are many different ways that you can reach out to get the help you need and deserve.

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black and white photo of woman struggling addiction

Addiction rehab options – in-patient or out-patient

Addiction treatment for YOU

Choosing between in-patient or out-patient addiction rehab facilities can be a difficult decision for some, as each can have its benefits.

Deciding to put drug and alcohol use behind you can be a challenging and overwhelming experience, but know you never have to be alone and that there is always someone to support you. Making the decision to get sober is and will always be the hardest part, but staying committed to you decision is imperative for continued success.  To help you with deciding whether in-patient addiction treatment or out-patient addiction treatment is the best option, we have broken down the pros and cons of each.

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group of women outside in the summer

Summertime sobriety

Summer is in full swing. The sun is hot, beaches are packed and backyard party invitations are endless. But with most invitations comes the popular phrase: BYOB. Last summer that would not have been a problem, after all you were the life of the party and always had a full cooler at the ready. This summer is a little different now that you have chosen a different path – a sober path. 

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addiction family holding hands

Addiction is a Family Disease

When you or somebody you love is struggling with addiction, it is often referred to as a family disease because of the impact the addiction has on the individual struggling and those around them. Being a family member of someone who is struggling can be extremely difficult because of the emotional turmoil that occurs while watching a loved one grapple with their battle with addiction. 

Some of the emotions that may arise from being a bystander to a loved one’s addiction include fear, anger, sadness, shame, guilt, anxiety and/ or depression. The emotions of helplessness and hopelessness are commonly experienced as you are forced to watch your loved one self-destruct. These feelings can evoke a belief that your loved one’s struggle with addiction is your responsibility: “Their pain is your pain; their struggle is your struggle.” 

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Commonly Abused Prescription Stimulants

Commonly Abused Prescription Drugs – Stimulants

Prescription stimulants like Adderall and Ritalin increase alertness, attention and energy by amplifying the activity of certain brain neurotransmitters including dopamine and norepinephrine. These prescription psychoactive drugs act similar to illegal substances like cocaine, crack and methamphetamine.

Originally prescribed for a wide variety of medical conditions, as the prevalence of abuse became more wide spread stricter standards were enacted. Today, prescription stimulants are predominately prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), narcolepsy, and occasionally depression.

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Commonly Abused Prescription Depressants

Commonly Abused Prescription Drugs – Depressants

Prescription depressants are used as popular sedatives, tranquilizers, and hypnotics. They work by increasing the amount of GABA (Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid) neurotransmitters in the brain to produce a calming effect on the central nervous system that reduces anxiety and over-stimulation and induces feelings of euphoria and relaxation.

Prescription depressants are grouped into three drug classes: Benzodiazepines, like Xanax, Valium, Klonopin, and Ativan; Barbiturates, like Nembutal; and Sedative-Hypnotics like Ambien, Lunesta and Sonata. Continue reading “Commonly Abused Prescription Drugs – Depressants”